The Reason Behind Widening Attitude Gaps In Workplace

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  • Meanwhile, a smaller majority (63%) of chief human resource officers (CHROs) say that employee well-being has deteriorated over the course of the pandemic.
  • Even more, CEOs are 41 points more likely to be very satisfied with their organization’s employee experience (EX) capabilities, according to the research.
  • For example, 41% of workers in the 18 to 29 age range strongly prefer working in the office.
  • An organization cannot know that without a mature approach to measuring employees’ feelings.

On the future of employment, business leaders and employees are at odds. Some past stories of return to office worries and assumptions about technology challenges for remote workers are refuted in the most recent research on workplace trends as reported by TechNews World.

Organizational performance

A report by technology and business solutions firm NTT released Nov. 9 reveals a significant gap between what organizations perceive as the future of work and what employees really want.

An almost identical majority of corporate execs and employees — 82 and 81 % of respondents — say that it has challenged organizational performance and is challenging for employees.

That contrast continues regarding the in-office surroundings.

“Currently, the narrative is all about remote working.

But the reality of employees’ needs is much more complicated, and any failure to accurately assess and respond to that fact presents a serious risk to organizations,” said Alex Bennett, global senior vice president for workplace and employee experience practice at NTT.

These are not mild preferences, he noted.

Future of Work

One of the most extensive and data-driven studies on the future of work to date, the Global Workplace Report, identified some intriguing themes:

  • Flexibility and support are what employees genuinely seek. Flexible hours, wellness, remote/hybrid work, and a better work environment are the top four tactics used to satisfy the expectations of a modern workforce.
  • Two-thirds of employees believe they don’t have all the tools they need to work from home, yet more than half (55%) of companies claim they’re ready for hybrid working.
  • Nine out of ten people no longer consider their employment to be a physical structure. However, just half of the businesses (54%) have been able to develop and agree on their future workplace strategy.
  • Employee experience (EX) misalignment is a serious problem. Employee health and well-being are the most important factors influencing their overall experience, yet employers and employees disagree.
  • The usefulness of EX as a strategy or critical strategic differentiator is recognised by a large majority of firms (91%). However, only 23% of employees are extremely satisfied with their jobs. Only 38% believe their employer places high importance on their health and well-being.

Wide Perception Gaps

Broad awareness of the issue is not always translating into a realistic assessment of organizational capability.

Even more, CEOs are 41 points more likely to be very satisfied with their organization’s employee experience (EX) capabilities, according to the research.

Just 38 % reported their employer fully values their health and well-being.

The slim margins are 30 % for the first two options and 39 % for the third choice.

For example, 41 % of workers in the 18 to 29 age range strongly prefer working in the office.

More Insight Awareness

A clear view of employees’ outlooks is more difficult to see because companies lack thorough data and insight collection, according to the report.

In terms of data priorities, slightly more than half (52 %) of businesses report VoE being a top focus.

Almost all (89 %) agree that environment, social, and governance (ESG) objectives are at the heart of the organization’s agenda.

Instead, think in terms of how it actually benefits the workforce.

“An organization cannot know that without a mature approach to measuring employees’ feelings.

Surprisingly, two-thirds of employees say they are not yet equipped with all the tools they need to work from home, and yet 55 % of organizations say they are strongly satisfied that they are ready for hybrid working,” he observed.

Shift in Thinking

Companies must shift their thinking from activities to outcomes, according to Bennett. What matters isn’t what businesses do to improve the workplace.

It’s more important to consider how the changes will benefit the workforce. Without a mature strategy to measure employee feelings, an organisation will not know.

“Clearly, there is a recognition on some level that immature workforce policies can lead to employee dissatisfaction, and that work should be driven by what people genuinely need,” Bennet said.

Conclusions Drawn

This great “work from home” experiment the global pandemic forced led workers and companies to realize with the correct infrastructure in place, productivity can be maintained, observed Darryl Wilson, vice president of solution and service architecture — managed collaboration services for NTT Americas Division.

“However, what surprised me from the data was the apparent disconnect between the CEO/executives on their preparedness versus the teams in operations that have to execute this digital transformation agenda and the fact that a significant number of users (61%) still don’t believe they have the correct technology at home,” he told TechNewsWorld.

They need an interconnected technology platform to support the hybrid workplace and employees.

That need cuts across many areas of IT and cannot be looked at in isolation.

“Our report has shown there still exists some gaps in delivering the promise.”

Once the technology platform fits the purpose, the likely cultural and HR changes will make the experience work.

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Source: TechNews World

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