Mandatory Requirements On Enclosed Space Entry and Rescue Drills

8971

Space Entry

International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted amendments to SOLAS Regulation III/19 which added a new requirement for mandatory enclosed space entry and rescue drills.

From 1 January 2015 all persons involved in enclosed space entries, and / or assigned enclosed space rescue duties, are required to take part in enclosed space entry and rescue drills at intervals not exceeding two months.

As per the new amendment:

  1. Enclosed space entry and rescue drills should be planned and conducted in a safe manner, taking into account, as appropriate, the guidance provided in the recommendations developed by the Organization.
  2. Each enclosed space entry and rescue drill shall include:
    • Checking and use of personal protective equipment required for entry
    • Checking and use of communication equipment and procedures
    • Checking and use of instruments for measuring the atmosphere in enclosed spaces
    • Checking and use of rescue equipment and procedures and
    • Instructions in first aid and resuscitation techniques
  3. Every crew member shall receive instructions which shall include but not necessarily limited to risks associated with enclosed spaces.
  4. On-board procedures for safe entry into such spaces should take into account, as appropriate, the guidance provided in recommendations developed by the Organization.

Training must elaborate on:

  • Confined space – Safe entry procedure
  • Permit-to-work and permit-to-enter
  • The hazards associated with entry into dangerous spaces and the precautions to be taken
  • The clothing required for entry into dangerous spaces
  • Testing of the atmosphere
  • Preparation for Entering Confined Spaces
  • Personal Protection Equipment (PPE)
  • Schedule of regular onboard drills for crews.

Only trained personnel should be assigned the duties of entering the enclosed space.

Ship’s crews vested with rescue and first aid duties should be drilled periodically on rescue and first aid procedures.

Training should include as a minimum:

  • Identification of the hazards likely to be faced during entry into enclosed spaces;
  • Recognition of the signs of adverse health effects caused by exposure to hazards during entry
  • Knowledge of personal protective equipment required for entry.

Actions required:

Ship managers should implement a training and familiarization program onboard vessels to train the crew members in handling relevant operations and procedures safely.  Crew’s sufficient training will also be noticed by PSCO during drills and relevant CIC.

Source: SQE MARINE