Risk-based Inspection of BWT for Tanker Ships Crucial for Ensuring Safety

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  • The integrity of the ship’s steel construction is through proper maintenance.
  • This is a key factor in the safe transportation of cargo on a worldwide scale.
  • TMSA 3 guidelines encourage shipowners to develop methodologies for ballast tanks inspections using various risk criteria.
  • The minimum inspection frequency cannot be less than that imposed by international standards.
  • This article describes a ballast tank-inspection model based on a range of identified risk factors.

According to an article published in InfoMarine, the integrity of the ship’s steel construction through proper maintenance is a key factor in the safe transportation of cargo on a worldwide scale.

TMSA 3 guidelines

According to the TMSA 3 guidelines, shipowners are encouraged by major oil producers to develop methodologies for ballast tanks inspections using various risk criteria.

Nonetheless, the minimum inspection frequency cannot be less than that imposed by international standards. The aim of this work is to describe a ballast tank-inspection model based on a range of identified risk factors.

Risk-based tank inspection

The main objective of the risk-based tank inspection is to develop a new systematic inspection framework that will determine the inspection intervals based on the tank findings and not the strict inspection time frame set by international standards. This is undoubtedly a holistic approach to preventive surveillance and maintenance that can be applied to any ship, highlighting potential problem areas in a timely manner so that corrective action can be taken promptly and effectively.

Focusing inspection on critical areas of failure is another important advantage as it avoids the repetition of past mistakes that have led to major ecological disasters. In any case, this inspection model can give significant reliability to freighters by facilitating the efficient operation of fleet vessels.

References

  1. ABS, (2017), Guide for Hull Inspection and Maintenance Program, Houston, TX, USA.
  2. ABS, (2007), Guidance notes on the inspection, maintenance and application of marine coating systems, 3rd
  3. ABS HIMP, (2017), Inspection Grading Criteria for the ABS Hull Inspection and Maintenance Program (HIMP)
  4. Basu R., Lee Ai-Kuo, (2006), A flexible approach to the application of risk-based methods to the inspection of hull structures, ABS technical papers.
  5. Drozyner P., Veith E., (2002), Risk-Based Insp. Methodology Overview, p. 82-88.
  6. IACS, (2007), Double Hull Oil Tankers, Guidelines for surveys, Assessment, and Repair of Hull Structures
  7. IACS (2015) Rec 87: Guidelines for Coating Maintenance & Repairs for Ballast Tanks and Combined Cargo / Ballast Tanks on Oil Tankers, June 2004/Rev.1 2006/Rev.2 2015.
  8. IACS, (2016), Hull Surveys of Double Hull Oil Tankers
  9. IMO, (2011), MSC.1/Circ.1399, 10 June 2011.
  10. Kalghatgi S.G., Serratella C., Hagan J.B., (2009), Hull Inspection and Maintenance Systems.
  11. OCIMF, (2017), Tanker Management and Self-Assessment 3, A Best Practice Guide.
  12. TSCF, (2014), Tanker Structure Co-operative Forum – Guidelines for the Inspection and Maintenance of Double Hull Tanker Structures

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Source: Infomarine

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