Ship & Shore Safety Checklist For Chemical Tankers – Part 1

317

  • Cargo loading and unloading operations of seagoing chemical carriers involve numerous critical procedures.
  • Wire ropes and fibre ropes should not be used together in the same direction because of the difference in their elastic properties.
  • The controlling personnel on ship and shore should maintain effective communication with their respective supervisors.

Cargo loading and unloading operations of seagoing chemical carriers involve numerous critical procedures that need to be precisely monitored, says an article published on chemical tanker guide website. 

  1. Is the ship securely moored? 

Ships should remain adequately secured in their moorings. Alongside piers or quays, ranging of the ship should be prevented by keeping all mooring lines taut: attention should be given to the movement of the ship caused by wind, currents, tides or passing ships and the operation in progress. 

Wire ropes and fibre ropes should not be used together in the same direction (i.e. breasts, springs, head or stern) because of the difference in their elastic properties.

Once moored, ships fitted with automatic tension winches should not use such winches in the automatic mode. The wind velocity at which loading arms should be disconnected, cargo operations stopped or the vessel unberthed should be stated.

Means should be provided to enable quick and safe release of the ship in case of an emergency. Irrespective of the mooring method used, the emergency release operation should be agreed, taking into account the possible risks involved. 

In ports where anchors are required to be used, special consideration should be given to this matter. Anchors not in use should be properly secured.

  1. Are emergency towing wires correctly positioned?

Emergency towing wires (fire wires) should be positioned both on the off-shore bow and quarter of the ship. At a buoy mooring, emergency towing wires should be positioned on the side opposite to the hose string. – There are various methods for rigging emergency towing wires currently in use. Some terminals may require a particular method to be used and the ship should be advised accordingly.

  1. Is there safe access between ship and shore?

The access should be positioned as far away from the manifolds as practicable. The means of access to the ship should be safe and may consist of an appropriate gangway or accommodation ladder with a properly secured safety net fitted to it.

Particular attention to safe access should be given where the difference in level between the point of access on the vessel and the jetty or quay is large or likely to become large. 

When terminal access facilities are not available and a ship’s gangway is used, there should be an adequate landing area on the berth to provide the gangway with a sufficient clear run of space and so maintain safe and convenient access to the ship at all states of tide and changes in the ship’s freeboard. 

Near the access ashore, appropriate life-saving equipment should be provided by the terminal. A lifebuoy should be available on board the ship near the gangway or accommodation ladder. The access should be safely and properly illuminated during darkness. 

Persons who have no legitimate business on board, or who do not have the master’s permission, should be refused access to the ship.The terminal should control access to the jetty or berth in agreement with the ship.

  1. Is the ship ready to move under its own power?

The ship should be able to move under its own power at short notice, unless permission to immobilise the ship has been granted by the port authority and the terminal manager. Certain conditions may have to be met for permission to be granted.

  1. Is there an effective deck watch in attendance on board and adequate supervision on the terminal and on the ship?

The operation should be under constant control both on ship and shore. Supervision should be aimed at preventing the development of hazardous situations; if however such a situation arises, the controlling personnel should have adequate means available to take corrective action. 

The controlling personnel on ship and shore should maintain effective communication with their respective supervisors. All personnel connected with the operations should be familiar with the dangers of the substances handled.

Did you subscribe to our daily newsletter?

It’s Free! Click here to Subscribe!

Source: chemical tanker guide 

LEAVE A REPLY

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.