West Club Explains What To Expect During PSC Inspections

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In the latest instalment of their Learn the Ropes series, West P&I Club informs what operators should expect during Port State Control (PSC) inspections, reports Safety4sea.

Adherence to safety regulations and crew welfare is essential

Port State Control (PSC) is a crucial global mechanism overseen by national organizations under Memorandums of Understanding on Port State Control. Its purpose is to inspect foreign seagoing vessels calling at ports to ensure compliance with international standards for safety, security, and environmental protection set by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Vessels failing to meet these standards may be detained, halting their departure until deficiencies are rectified. Immediate detention can occur for vessels deemed unsafe during inspections, disrupting voyages and causing financial losses. Thus, proactive adherence to safety regulations and crew welfare is essential to avoid PSC detentions.

Concentrated Inspection Campaigns target specific areas at a higher risk of non-compliance. This risk may be indicated by the number of deficiencies found, accidents, or the implementation of new convention requirements. CICs are carried out annually over a three-month period (September to November) and are conducted alongside regular inspections.

Port State Control (PSC) is a crucial global mechanism overseen by national organizations under Memorandums of Understanding on Port State Control. Its purpose is to inspect foreign seagoing vessels calling at ports to ensure compliance with international standards for safety, security, and environmental protection set by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Vessels failing to meet these standards may be detained, halting their departure until deficiencies are rectified. Immediate detention can occur for vessels deemed unsafe during inspections, disrupting voyages and causing financial losses. Thus, proactive adherence to safety regulations and crew welfare is essential to avoid PSC detentions.

Concentrated Inspection Campaigns target specific areas at a higher risk of non-compliance. This risk may be indicated by the number of deficiencies found, accidents, or the implementation of new convention requirements. CICs are carried out annually over a three-month period (September to November) and are conducted alongside regular inspections.

Crew Wages and Seafarer Employment Agreements

The Paris MoU Committee discussed the results of the Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) on Fire Safety, held from 1 September to 30 November 2023. Overall, compliance appeared to be satisfactory. The result was less favourable on two specific topics; maintenance of fire doors (9.3% non-compliance) and performing fire drills (9.2% non-compliance).

The Paris MoU expects the industry to give these issues the necessary attention. Future CICs will cover Crew Wages and Seafarer Employment Agreements under MLC (2024), Ballast Water Management (2025), and Cargo Securing (2026). During 2023, the Paris MoU conducted, on a trial basis, Focused Inspection Campaigns (FICs) aimed at improving the effectiveness of inspection campaigns. These focused inspections have now been carried out on Pilot Transfer Arrangements, Electronic Chart Display Information Systems (ECDIS), and on the Galley.

The Paris MoU will continue to implement these FICs, announced and unannounced.

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Source: Safety4sea