What Is Stopping Distance For A Ship?

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Credit: Jonas/Unsplash

What is Stopping Distance and how many types of Stopping Distances are there?, intrigues a Funnel2funnel news source.

What is stopping distance?

Stopping distance is the distance covered by a ship (which is making headway), after the engines are stopped.
Stopping distance are of two types :
1. Inertia Stop
2. Crash Stop

Credit: Knowledgeofsea

1. Inertia Stop: when the engine of the ship is stopped, the ship will continue moving in the same direction for some more distance due to inertia. Here no astern command is given (used to produce “braking effect” for ships), and hence ship will travel more distance in the inertia stop method.

2. Crash Stop: Here the engine, which is moving in an ahead direction is given an order for full astern, leaving the rudder in the mid ship position to stop the ship within minimum distance and shortest possible time.

Stopping distance is the distance, which, a ship will continue to move after action is taken to stop engines and till the ship comes to rest. Stopping distance details may be provided for sea speed, harbour speed, half speed etc. It may be provided for loaded & light conditions.

Precise course & speed over

Nowadays the precise course & speed over ground may be read directly on a GPS receiver. A navigator makes the best use of this facility. A time speed graph may be prepared for ‘stop manoeuvre. During an ‘Inertia or simple stop’ manoeuvre carried out in open sea it may be necessary to take into account the currents, if any, as the current might continue to carry the ship.

Thus a student might Wonder as to ‘why GPS is still showing, say ‘2 knot speed the while Water alongside may appear to be still with respect to the ship. Out at sea. ship is considered stopped when she is stopped w.r.t water in which she is floating. The direction and the motion shown by GPS at that moment are the set and drift the current. In harbour, a stop as desired by a pilot might mean stop w.r.t ground wharf, or w.r.t a ship alongside Which your ship is to be double banked. A student must understand that there is no standard stopping distance, which is true for all ships.Following observations are important in relations to stopping distance.

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Source: Funnel2Funnel and Knowledgeofsea

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