Ship & Shore Safety Checklist For Chemical Tankers

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  • Communication should be maintained in the most efficient way between the responsible officer on duty on the ship and the responsible person ashore.
  • The agreed signal to be used in the event of an emergency arising ashore or on board should be clearly understood by shore and ship personnel.
  • Many tanker cargoes contain components which are known to be hazardous to human health.

Cargo loading and unloading operations of seagoing chemical carriers involve numerous critical procedures that need to be precisely monitored, says an article published on chemical tanker guide website. 

  1. Is the agreed ship/shore communication system operative?

Communication should be maintained in the most efficient way between the responsible officer on duty on the ship and the responsible person ashore.

When telephones are used, the telephone both on board and ashore should be continuously manned by a person who can immediately contact his respective supervisor. Additionally, the supervisor should have a facility to override all calls. 

When RT/VHF systems are used the units should preferably be portable and carried by the supervisor or a person who can get in touch with his respective supervisor immediately. Where fixed systems are used the guidelines for telephones should apply.

The selected system of communication, together with the necessary information on telephone numbers and/or channels to be used, should be recorded on the appropriate form. This form should be signed by both ship and shore representatives. The telephone and portable RT/VHF systems should comply with the appropriate safety requirements.

  1. Has the emergency signal to be used by the ship and shore been explained and understood?

The agreed signal to be used in the event of an emergency arising ashore or on board should be clearly understood by shore and ship personnel.

  1. Have the procedures for cargo, bunker and ballast handling been agreed?

The procedures for the intended operation should be pre-planned. They should be discussed and agreed upon by the ship and shore representatives prior to the start of the operations. Agreed arrangements should be formally recorded and signed by both ship and terminal representatives. 

Any change in the agreed procedure that could affect the operation should be discussed by both parties and agreed upon. After agreement has been reached by both parties, substantial changes should be recorded in writing as soon as possible and in sufficient time before the change in procedure takes place. 

In any case, the change should be recorded in writing within the working period of those supervisors on board and ashore who reached the agreement.

The operations should be suspended and all deck and vent openings closed on the approach of an electrical storm. The properties of the substances handled, the equipment of ship and shore installation, the ability of the ship’s crew and shore personnel to execute the necessary operations and to control the operations sufficiently are factors which should be taken into account when ascertaining the possibility of handling a number of substances concurrently.

The manifold areas both on board and ashore should be safely and properly illuminated during darkness. The initial and maximum loading rates, topping off rates and normal stopping times should be agreed, having regard to:

  • the nature of the cargo to be handled;
  • the arrangement and capacity of the ship’s cargo lines and gas venting systems;
  • the maximum allowable pressure and flow rate in the ship/shore hoses and loading arms;
  • precautions to avoid accumulation of static electricity;
  • any other flow control limitations.

A formal record to this effect should be made as above.

  1. Have the hazards associated with toxic substances in the cargo being handled been identified and understood?

Many tanker cargoes contain components which are known to be hazardous to human health. In order to minimise the impact on personnel, information on cargo constituents should be available during the cargo transfer to enable proper precautions to be adopted. 

In addition, some port states require such information to be readily available during cargo transfer and in the event of an accidental spill.

The information provided should identify the constituents by chemical name, name in common usage, UN number and the maximum concentration expressed as a percentage by volume.

  1. Has the emergency shutdown procedure been agreed?

An emergency shutdown procedure should be agreed between ship and shore, formally recorded and signed by both the skip and terminal representatives.

The agreement should state the circumstances in which operations have to be stopped immediately.

Due regard should be given to the possible introduction of dangers associated with the emergency shutdown procedure.

For previous question please check ship& shore checklist  article.

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Source: chemical tanker guide 

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