Singapore-Based GCMD Considering Offloading CO2 From Ships

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Credits: Marcin Jozwiak/ Unsplash
  • GCMD expects to make one award in the second quarter of 2023 upon completing the proposal evaluations.
  • For shipboard carbon capture technologies to be operationally feasible, the industry needs to develop a value chain for the captured CO2.
  • Japanese trading house Mitsui and Shell have also agreed to collaborate to evaluate options for owning and chartering ships to carry liquefied CO2.

Singapore-based Global Centre for Maritime Decarbonisation (GCMD) on 6 December issued an invitation for proposals to evaluate the safety, technical and operational requirements for offloading CO2 captured on ships.

Proposal evaluation

GCMD is part of a seven-member consortium that aims to study how best to offload liquefied CO2 from capture systems on board vessels, based on the proposals submitted. 

GCMD expects to make one award in the second quarter of 2023 upon completing the proposal evaluations.

The scope of the study includes the process of offloading liquefied CO2 captured onboard tankers, bulkers and container lines at different temperatures and pressures to different receptacles, which includes vessels that can receive liquefied CO2, and intermediary storage sites through ship-to-ship, ship-to-shore or ship-to-floating storage. 

The evaluation will also account for existing policies and regulations that may aid or hamper the process.

Carbon capture

GCMD, the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative as well as tanker operator Stena Bulk in October launched a two-year test to capture carbon onboard a tanker. 

The project was developed with other members of the consortium — Swedish marine technology manufacturer Alfa Laval, the American Bureau of Shipping, ship design firm Deltamarin and Dutch technological institute TNO.

“GCMD views shipboard carbon capture as an important mid-term technological solution that can help reduce shipping’s [greenhouse gas] emissions,” said GCMD chief executive officer Lynn Loo. 

“For shipboard carbon capture technologies to be operationally feasible, the industry needs to develop a value chain for the captured CO2.”

Co2 capture collaborations

More firms have been considering shipboard carbon capture, as it allows for the reduction of emissions without switching to alternative marine fuels. 

South Korean shipbuilding Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering is looking to develop an onboard carbon capture and storage system with its Greek and US partners. 

Japanese trading house Mitsui and Shell have also agreed to collaborate to evaluate options for owning and chartering ships to carry liquefied CO2.

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Source: Argus Media

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